Meet the MedMaster

Seeing the medical forest through the trees

MedMaster was founded in 1979 by Stephen Goldberg MD, after his first book, Clinical Neuroanatomy Made Ridiculously Simple, was rejected by multiple publishers for making a serious topic funny and being too brief. One rejection letter from a major university press included a brutal critique of Goldberg’s manuscript:

“The inane examples … alone would alienate both faculty and students. There may be a small group of medical students who might enjoy the sophomoric humor, but most of these students have been frozen socially since the sixth grade and do not represent the medical student community.”

Dr. Goldberg subsequently decided to self publish and created MedMaster Inc. Clinical Neuroanatomy MRS is now approaching close to 500,000 copies sold, MedMaster has published over 40 titles, and has distributed over 3 million books, with many students sharing their copies. Go figure!

Dr. Goldberg, a graduate of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, trained in Neurology, Ophthalmology and Family Medicine. He served as a 2nd lieutenant in the U.S. Coast Guard Merchant Marine during the Vietnam War and spent 13 years doing research on neuronal development and regeneration. He has taught medical students and residents for 25 years at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, where he is Professor Emeritus. He received the George Paff Award for Most Outstanding Professor eleven times. He was invited, in view of his contributions to medical education, to give the keynote address to the medical school graduating class at the Washington University at St. Louis School of Medicine in 2004.

Dr.Goldberg has joined with +185 qualified authors/contributors of like mind to write other MedMaster titles, which are regularly updated.

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The Goldberg Files is based on Dr. Goldberg’s own struggles as well as his many students’ struggles that he observed while teaching medical school for 25 years. This extensive blog is dedicated to assisting students in dealing with the stresses of medical education.