Orthopedics Made Ridiculously Simple

(8 customer reviews)

A brief, clear overview of clinical orthopedics, including diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic emergencies and relevant clinical signs “no one should miss.” Chapters address the upper and lower limbs, the axial skeleton, systemic conditions affecting the musculoskeletal system, and common pediatric conditions. Each topic is covered with regards to the relevant anatomy, clinical approach, and specific problems not to be overlooked. Excellent for medical students and interns, PA’s, nurses and nurse practitioners.

Companion Digital Download of Atlas of Orthopedics program (Win/Mac).

$24.95

Book Details

Pages

103

ISBN

9780940780866

Publication

Edition 1 (October 15, 2014)

Language

English

Digital

Includes download of Atlas of Orthopedic Images and Movies (WIN/MAC)

About The Author

Patrice Tétreault

Patrice Tetreault, MD, is Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, CHUM - Pavillon Notre-Dame, University of Montreal.

Hugue Ouellette

Hugue Ouellette M.D.: Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Director of Education Musculoskeletal Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School.

Free Digital Download of Atlas of Orthopedics Program

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1. MUSCULOSKELETAL BASICS
Terminology
– Orientation in space
– Movement in space
– General orthopedic terms
Musculoskeletal conditions
Radiology
Fractures and dislocations
Emergencies
– Compartment syndrome
– Open fracture
– Neurological/ vascular injury

CHAPTER 2. UPPER LIMB
Shoulder
– Impingement syndrome/ Rotator cuff tear
– Adhesive capsulitis
– Proximal humeral fracture
– Clavicular fracture
– Acromioclavicular joint dislocation
– Glenohumeral joint dislocation

Arm
– Proximal biceps rupture
– Distal biceps tendon rupture
– Humeral shaft fracture

Elbow
– Tennis and golf elbow (epicondylitis)
– Olecranon bursitis
– Distal humeral fracture
– Olecranon fracture
– Radial head fracture
– Elbow dislocation

Forearm
– Radial and ulnar fractures
– Monteggia and Galeazzi fracture-dislocations
– Distal radial and ulnar fractures

Wrist and Hand
– Carpal tunnel syndrome
– Kienböck’s disease
– De Quervain tenosynovitis
– Dupuytren contractures
– Trigger finger (flexor tenosynovitis)
– Scaphoid fracture
– Peri-lunate and lunate dislocation
– First metacarpal base fracture (Bennet’s and Rolando’s fractures)
– Skier’s or gameskeeper’s thumb (ulnar collateral ligament injury)
– Boxer’s fracture ( fourth or fifth metacarpal neck fracture)
– Distal phalanx fractures

CHAPTER 3. LOWER LIMB
Hip
– Trochanteric bursitis
– Fractures
– Dislocation

Thigh
– Femoral shaft fracture

Knee
– Ligamentous injury (Highchair lesions)
– Meniscal tear
– Extensor mechanism injury
– Tibial plateau fracture
– Distal femoral fracture

Leg
– Tibial and fibular fracture

Foot and Ankle
– Metatarsalgia
– Hallux valgus
– Heel pain and plantar fasciitis
– Ankle sprain and fracture
– Talar fracture
– Calcaneal fracture
– Lisfranc fracture
– Metatarsal fracture

CHAPTER 4. AXIAL SKELETON
Spinal column
– Vertebral disk disease
– Spondylolysis/listhesis
– Spinal stenosis
– Spinal cord injury
– Cervical fracture and dislocation
– Thoraco-lumbar fracture

Pelvis
– Pelvic ring fracture

CHAPTER 5. SYSTEMIC CONDITIONS
Infection
Septic arthritis
Osteomyelitis
Arthritis
Osteoarthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis
Crystal arthropathy (Gout, Pseudo-gout, Chondrocalcinosis)
Metabolic bone disease
Osteoporosis
Osteomalacia
Avascular necrosis
Bone tumors
Benign bone tumors
Malignant bone tumors

CHAPTER 6. PEDIATRIC ORTHOPEDICS
Fractures and Dislocations
– Radial Head Dislocation
– Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis
– Congenital Hip Dislocation
Osteochondrosis (Osgood-Schlatter and Sever Diseases)
Osteogenesis Imperfecta (Brittle Bone Disease)
Child Abuse
Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease (Hip Osteonecrosis)

Lower Limb Anomalies
– Genu Varum
– Genu Valgum
– Axial Rotations (Toe-in, Toe-out)

Scoliosis

8 reviews for Orthopedics Made Ridiculously Simple

  1. Student – Concise, broad, and conceptual overview

    I read this book before my first Orthopaedic rotation as a fourth year medical student and it was a superb introduction to Orthopaedic Surgery. It is very concise and well written, and introduces key concepts and fundamental principles of Orthopaedics. As most medical students know, the best learning on clerkships comes from reading about clinical situations as they come up in real life. That said, its always helpful to have a brief introduction to the field before beginning a rotation and I thought this book had the breadth and focus on concepts to be a perfect introductory read since my medical school has little to no coverage of common MSK conditions in the curriculum. More depth can always be found on Orthobullets and in textbooks and the primary literature, but it’s helpful to have a broad overview to start out.

  2. J. Lin – One of the better ones

    I got this book as a gift for an out-of-town doctor friend of mine who was staying with me while he was doing a rotation in orthopedics at a local hospital. My friend had some other Ridiculously Simple books so I thought it would be a fitting gift.

    To make a long story short, my friend absolutely loved the book was definitely glad I had gotten it for him. Since then he’s gotten other reference books, but he’s said this particular book was probably one of the better ones that he’s read on the subject. He said that it really easy to understand and got him up to speed in no time.

    So, bottom line is if you are, or know someone, who is a doctor getting into orthopedics, I recommend you check this book out.

  3. J in FLA – Med school orthopedics (basic orthopedics) presented in an easy to understand format.

    This book is well written and easy to follow. I’m a fan of this publishers “Clinical Pathology Made Ridiculously Simple,” and I found this book to be similar in presentation. This is a good book for Medical and PA students during their orthopedic didactic curriculum, and as a review before an orthopedic rotation, but it’s a little too basic to be the only book you read during your orthopedic clerkship (for clerkship, I recommend also reading Case Files Orthopaedic Surgery).This is a good book to review orthopedic concepts for board exams. It’s also a good book for primary care residents and primary care mid-level providers who want to brush up on ortho.

  4. nickel – It is very concise with many illustrations and fun to read

    using this book to study for the ONC cert exam. It is very concise with many illustrations and fun to read. I’ll update my review after I take the exam

  5. Scott H. – Yep pretty handy

    Yep pretty handy

  6. Katherine B – very concise

    This book was written in a concise and condensed manner. I recommend it for all health care university students and curious patients.

  7. Danny K. – Five Stars

    Good – easy to read & understand

  8. A.C. – Better too much information than not enough

    Went into significantly more detail than expected, but that’s okay. Better too much information than not enough.

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